Sarah Silverman, a famous female comedian has a lot to say, but is it worth hearing? From the jokes to the shows, she’s been a fierce power player in the entertainment industry for the past ten years. On Psychology Today, it was mentioned that she was roasted by Seth Rogan for her age, and with only a few seconds of abashment, she retorted with wit and assertion. A palpable hit to the audiences for both men…and women.

Reading this Article, I came to an interesting issue that many of us never come to consider – whether because it has been such a social norm, or that the dispute had been set aside for far too long: women are demeaned as entertainers! The idea seemed bias, at first, being that women are the icons of worship on media – neither virgin or tramp were less than glorified in movies, TV, books, or videogames. But the point was set, and the terrible details sprouted from their age long roots. When men make fun of men, they can be bad, but when men make fun of women it is detrimental; and if that wasn’t enough, the issue continue amongst women, as the problem continues with those that are afraid of the macho bravado world of boys.

The intriguing side to it all is when women make fun of men, and talk about the terms of whose feelings are hurt, it’s the men that stand up offended first. According to Silverman, men seem to be more sensitive over the fact that women don’t care about men in their priorities in life. A man will strut for women, complain about women, but all a girl cares about is how much bras cost, and how tampons suck. Nothing screams “I need a man in my life.”

Pragmatic over the idea of being excluded from a woman’s lifestyle, the male comedian has always kept the girls down with sharp tongue. Women would always make fun of women, but then men would ride on it, and soon the art of bullying continues in stand up comedy. Now though, women don’t care. Tina Fey is more candid, Silverman is more awkward, and the lineage of female comedians nonchalantly caring less and less about men are rising. The threat seems to be a problem, and in due time, it will explode. Discrimination won’t last too long in the comic industry.

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